Academic Papers

About this page

Academic Papers is a new section we launch this month. Participants at the recent Afrocentric journalism curriculum workshop at Wits University (July 3-4) requested a facility to share papers.

This platform will serve as a resource that prompts dialogue, encourages decolonisation and afro-centric learning, peer review, and easy access to research as it emerges. Should you have the desire to contribute a research paper email Mthobeli Ngcongo at NgcongoM@ufs.ac.za.

SACOMM is an organization that links academic departments across the country in the discipline of media, journalism and communications. SACOMM holds an annual conference to bring interested scholars together. The Emerging Scholars Network is a group within this organization that supports young scholars.

THESIS Of – Onkgopotse JJ Tabane

THESIS Of – Onkgopotse JJ Tabane

BRIDGING THE GAP: AN ANALYSIS OF THE COMPLICATED RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GOVERNMENT AND THE MEDIA 23 YEARS INTO DEMOCRACY Download the full paper on this link: 77X OJJ TABANE FINAL THESIS AS OF 25 APRIL 2020 (1) (2) (1)

Noma and the 3C’s

Noma and the 3C’s

Noma and the 3C’s – COVID-19, CAPTITALISM and CLIMATE CHANGE

Solidarity During the ‘Outsourcing Must Fall’ Campaign: The Role of Different Players in Ending Outsourcing at South African Universities

Solidarity During the ‘Outsourcing Must Fall’ Campaign: The Role of Different Players in Ending Outsourcing at South African Universities

Mondli Hlatshwayo, Centre for Education Rights and Transformation, University of Johannesburg, South Africa ABSTRACT In South Africa, outsourced workers began their struggles in the 1990s, when universities started to implement the outsourcing of services that were considered non-core by university administrations. In analysing the struggle against outsourcing of 2015 and 2016, different scholars have tended to emphasise the role of either the outsourced workers or the student activists of...

Book Review: Herman Wasserman’s Media, Geopolitics, and Power: A View from the Global South.

Book Review: Herman Wasserman’s Media, Geopolitics, and Power: A View from the Global South.

[intro]The over two decades of the abolishment of the apartheid regime and the development of democracy in South Africa have been the subject of countless volumes and research articles, ranging from historical overviews and technical examinations to sociological inquiries and ethnographic reports. Herman Wasserman's Media, Geopolitics and Power, the seventh volume in the Geopolitics of Information series published by the University of Illinois Press, makes a point of taking both a step back...

Date My Family Twitter discourses and social conventions

Date My Family Twitter discourses and social conventions

[intro]While South Africa’s television history may be young and marked by the complexities of our political changes, a stimulating body of scholarly work on South African television has started to grow, especially on reality shows. This work is significant,  because there is now need to do more work on how viewers interact on social media with other followers of South African TV programmes and shows. This will enable us to uncover and analyse perceptions, different ideologies and discourses...

Voices of protest: The inner lives of women in social movements

Voices of protest: The inner lives of women in social movements

[intro]It has been 62 years since the Federation of South African Women bravely took a stand against the injustices of Apartheid laws. Despite this fact, the role that women play in social movements and social movement organisations in not fully recognised. By Thembelihle Maseko[/intro] Even though researchers and publishers who write about women’s experiences and dynamics within the movements note that these spaces are dominated by women; the way that they write about them tends to exclude...

Your cell phone or our cell phone? The negotiation of cell phone usage rules in romantic relationships

Your cell phone or our cell phone? The negotiation of cell phone usage rules in romantic relationships

[intro]By Mthobeli Ngcongo[/intro] We often take for granted both the importance of cell phones in affording us to stay connected with our partners. It is as it here an extension of ourselves that allows us to be within reach of those we love. However, the mobile phone often presents a double-edged sword in romantic relationships. While the mobile phone can enhance the quality of communication, it can simultaneously become a source of conflict. In romantic relationships, mobiles may be used...

Don’t be so nervous

Don’t be so nervous

[intro]By Mthobeli Ngcongo[/intro] The state of affairs both socially and economically following the administrative end of racialized forms of segregation in Africa remains a point of great contention. While some uncritically celebrate the changes that have resulted in the ‘post-colonial’ era, not everyone is sold on this proposition. Tsitsi Dangarembga is one of many voices who have called for a re-examination of the socio-political milieu in post liberated Africa. She adopts the concept neo...

Burning to consume? A look at izikhothane  as “aspirational consumers”!

Burning to consume? A look at izikhothane as “aspirational consumers”!

[intro]By Jabulani G. Mnisi[/intro] The month of June is regarded in South Africa as a month of the youth. Looking back to 1976 we cant help but think about the bloody sacrifice of the youth uprising that started in Soweto. Many young people lost their lives on the 16th of June in 1976 during the struggle against Bantu Education. The most notable death which in fact became a symbol of that struggle being that of the 12 year old Hector Peterson through the momentous photograph that was captured...

‘Enemy of the African Workers’: General Agent SM Bennett Ncwana

‘Enemy of the African Workers’: General Agent SM Bennett Ncwana

Many South Africans actively undermined ‘the struggle’, not least of all because it could be lucrative business. One notable ‘progressive’ sell-out in the 1920s was the propagandist Samuel Michael ‘SM’ Bennet Ncwana, who wrote for a prolific number of South African newspapers. He also promoted an unprecedented number of political causes, moving from Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) and South Africa’s first major black trade union, the Industrial and Commercial...

De-Westernising journalism curricula in South African universities: Where are we?

De-Westernising journalism curricula in South African universities: Where are we?

Dr Bevelyn Dube graduated with a PhD degree in Journalism from Stellenbosch University (SU) in December 2013. She is a lecturer at the University of Venda. Her address at the Universities Curriculum Workshop was titled “Confronting the Challenges of Africanising Curriculum in Media Disciplines”, and was hosted by Wits University. Dr Dube's paper interrogated the reasons journalism curricula in South African universities remain deeply embedded in Western epistemologies and philosophies. This is...

The decolonization of African knowledges

The decolonization of African knowledges

[intro]An address delivered at the for 9th Africa Day Lecture, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa, by Dr. Paul Tiyambe Zeleza.[/intro] Although capacity is limited given Africa's encounter with European settlers in the 15th century, Zeleza opened his talk on a positive note by pointing out that African has a role to play in world's knowledge production in higher education across the globe. Despite the potential, Zeleza acknowledged that colonilisation and its many social...

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