ISSUE #72

A shallow local democracy


Ward 63: We go to the polls without answers to important questions

Pressure to publish is choking the academic profession


‘Publish or perish’

The Sun shone briefly but brightly


1930s paper was led by C L Stewart and A S Hayes

Life in Ward 10, Bekkersdal


The historical factors that shaped local governance


Local Government in South Africa: Briefing Notes for Journalists: Part 2

Hlaudi, Jimi and freedom at the SABC


Charlotte Maxeke written back into history


First black woman graduate in South Africa

A Radical New Approach to the Field of Economics


“Suppose you were flown in from Mars and have to analyse capitalism”

Crafted by colours


A Tessa Muller Production

The Keeper of the Kumm comes to Cape Town


A 21st Century journalist finds her 19th Century ancestor

The United Nation’s “Blue Angels”


African women in aviation are trailblazers

Decolonisation by Data


A New Agenda for South African Social Science

Battling it out with words


Debate a potent agent of transformation and growth

In Search of Bessie Head


Public Memorialising through Theatre

ISSUE #72

Welcome to the December edition of The Journalist


This is the last edition for 2020. Our next edition will be in January 2021.

In this edition we highlight three important issues that were newsworthy in this month - the Presidential Elections in the USA, the announcement by the SABC that it was embarking on a programme of mass retrenchment and the ongoing campaigns against violence perpetrated on women and children.

We therefore have contributions that challenge the idea that the US is some kind of gold standard of democracy and instead show that the USA is at best a very flawed democracy and in no place to lecture Africans about democracy. We feature an article which, instead of downsizing, calls on us to debate the importance of the SABC as both a vehicle and a register of democracy in South Africa.

We also spotlight an investigate journalist’s allegations about police killings in Cato Manor in KZN which have been the subject of conflicting reports in the media since 2011. He calls for a judicial enquiry into these matters.

As befits November’s activism against Violence on Women and Children we spotlight an article which calls on us to swop a brand of toxic masculinity for a different kind of masculinity. In this regard our Arts section features the musician, Kadaf, who takes stand against male violence and patriarchy.

The Craft section features Glenda Daniel’s book, Power and Loss, which highlights the extent to which job losses in the media have occurred leading to the decimation of newsrooms.

Our Book Review section features a review of Patric Tariq Mellet’s The Lie of 1652, which debunks many of the colonial myths about 1652 - the apparent first meeting between Europeans and South African indigenous people – designed to justify the dispossession and exploitation which followed.


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