ISSUE #116

Tracking Saul ‘Mayimayi’ Msane’s roots


A hometown hero who was once labelled enemy of the people

New online course continues the work of Jeanette Minnie


Legacy of African media freedom giant lives on

No spanking, no smacking, spare the rod


Will the new Con court ruling stop violence in its tracks?

Pushing pause on gender-based violence


Does media reflect a violent society, or does it play a role in perpetuating violence?

#ClimateStrike: It’s getting hot in the classroom


School children in warmer climates are at risk

PODCAST: Should men be feminists?


"Change starts at home"

In sickness and in national health


Why the proposed NHI comes too soon in our developing country

Moon people: An interview with Nuotama Bodomo


On the 50th anniversary of humans landing on the moon, we take you back to Zambia's attempt to achieve that feat

Memories of two dark days in September


Killing of Imam Abdullah Haron and Steve Bantu Biko ‘left indelible mark’

The Olympic dream and dealing with depression as an elite athlete


Everything about mental health in professional sport needs to change

Book Review: They Called Me Queer


ISSUE #116

Welcome to the October edition of The Journalist


In this edition we are beginning to review 2020 and anticipating 2021. This year has been dominated by the Covid 19 pandemic and the impact the Lockdowns have had on our lives. While Covid 19 is by no means over, a key event in 2021 will be the 30th anniversary of the Windhoek Declaration on Press Freedom in May 2021.

We therefore have contributions that reflect on what press freedom may be like in the light of the persecution of Wikileaks founder, Julian Assange, and, with the increasing inequality in the world in the midst of the Covid pandemic, the challenges faced by journalists to give voice to experiences outside the ideological mainstream.

We spotlight a first-hand account of a doctor at the forefront of the struggles against Covid 19, a community voice telling us about the dire state of hunger and thirst in the Eastern Cape and an account of international solidarity of a South African studying in the USA.

Our Book Review honours a recent revisiting of Toussaint L’ Overture, the leader of the Haitian Revolution – the only successful slave revolution in modern history. The longer Academic section features a comic-book style account of the Three C’s confronting us today – Covid, Capitalism and Climate-change.


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