ISSUE #111

Housing income threshold must rise!


Strengthen purchasing power of the people

Binyavanga Wainaina’s rich legacy of writing as event


Africa has lost Binyavanga Wainaina. But his spirit will continue to inspire


He may have died, but is here to stay

Youth take to the streets but stay away from the polls


Political system excludes young people

Malume’s Painting: capturing history and humanity


The 1976 uprising told for our children

Are books the youth’s new protest posters?


Greatest wars are fought with words

Hitting pause on piracy


R11 million worth of illegal DVDs destroyed in Cape Town and Durban

The resilience of culture


Paedophiles inflict life sentences on victims


Child Protection Week: The need for greater vigilance

Baastards or Humans: The unfolding truth


“While Europe was experiencing the Dark Ages, Africa was in a period of enlightenment”

In the dark: Eskom’s debt woes sit at R500 billion


Medupi and Kusile are weighing down taxpayers

Experiences of a young black homosexual in Mzansi


Grappling with life in a post-apartheid South Africa

Through the lens of Bongani Mnguni (1953 – 2019)


The camera was his third eye through which he examined the world

Flaxman Qoopane: An expatriate in the diaspora


Tribute to a giant of the Arts

Creating Economic Freedom, with compensation


“Should our careers not work out, let’s start a business”

Stuurman and Makhanda: Anti-colonial rebels raised on boer farms


Reading David Stuurman’s life as a labour history of the colonised

Dear Readers:Once Again…

The Journalist has been off-line for the past four months because we were hacked. At the beginning of March 2020 we promised new material after we went into a period of reflection meant to be about reviewing the state of journalism, our content, our funding model and our targeted audience.

The review was interrupted by the Covid 19 pandemic and lockdown and, along with everyone else in the country, we had to be more creative about how to have our discussions. But the hacking of the site was of such an order that it not only froze the site but threatened to destroy all our existing and past material. Rebuilding the site and making it secure from future attacks has had to be our focus over the past period.

We apologise to you, our readers, and to young journalists for this extended delay. We especially apologise to those who submitted articles over the past 4 months. Where possible and relevant we will consider these for publication now that we are back live.

We are now live once more ….ready to pursue our mission to give “history and context to key issues facing journalists in South Africa.”

The Covid 19 pandemic has been the biggest public health crisis in the world since the Spanish flu of 1918. It has brought disease and death to many of our families and communities, and to healthcare workers and journalists, Including our own Lungile Tom and many others. Lungile Tom, an eNCA cameraman, is the only journalist to have died of the virus in our country so far. And, unless a vaccine is found and made freely available to all (meaning not closed off by patents and commercial barriers), Covid 19 may be with us for an unknown extended period of time.

But Covid 19 has also shone a light on all the issues facing humanity today – climate injustice, the vast inequalities, the abandonment of the poor majority by most governments, the parlous state of public healthcare and the social determinants of health, the growing authoritarianism and racism in many countries – from the USA to Brazil – and the collapse of countries in Africa and the Middle East by imperialist aggression.

Independent journalism continues to suffer through corporate strategies like shutting print media, downsizing and outsourcing functions, and putting up paywalls for online media. And by governments attacking independent and critical voices who do not play to mainstream and elite concerns.

The Journalist has become aware that the large majority of media professionals have had to take substantial pay-cuts during this pandemic. This is not an easy time for them and their families.

The Journalist, now that we are back, will continue to be counted in the effort to challenge narratives that limit deeper understandings of the national and international condition.

ISSUE #111

Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter and get notified of new issues.