ISSUE #109

Book Review: The List is a page turner


This `novel’ has a special place of honour

Sophia Yilma Deressa


Journalist, activist and politician

Our habits are destroying the environment


From sunscreen to plastic to e-waste, we need to be more conscious

The South African Communications Association partners with The Journalist


Establishing networks and rewriting history

The Making of the ‘White Karoo’


Where genocides of the indigenous and their violent subjugation are absent

From business to terrorism, the double edged sword of digital communication


African regulators work together to harmonise the regulation of creative content

Striking the media gender balance


Huge strides have been made over the decades – but we’ve yet to cover enough distance.

Ndinethembe: A young lady’s poetic journey of hope


Art exhibition: When Dust Settles


Weaving together memory and history

Bound to violence: toxic queer masculinities in South African films


Skoonheid and Inxeba broach previously suppressed discussions

Cents and Sensibility: Political parties funding secrets remain safe


Going into the voting station blindfolded

The South African Medical Research Council at 50


Overcoming the burden of history to becoming the patron of health research under democracy

Let us get this right – Women Are Not Rocks!


If you strike a woman she will bleed and die

Dear Readers:Once Again…

The Journalist has been off-line for the past four months because we were hacked. At the beginning of March 2020 we promised new material after we went into a period of reflection meant to be about reviewing the state of journalism, our content, our funding model and our targeted audience.

The review was interrupted by the Covid 19 pandemic and lockdown and, along with everyone else in the country, we had to be more creative about how to have our discussions. But the hacking of the site was of such an order that it not only froze the site but threatened to destroy all our existing and past material. Rebuilding the site and making it secure from future attacks has had to be our focus over the past period.

We apologise to you, our readers, and to young journalists for this extended delay. We especially apologise to those who submitted articles over the past 4 months. Where possible and relevant we will consider these for publication now that we are back live.

We are now live once more ….ready to pursue our mission to give “history and context to key issues facing journalists in South Africa.”

The Covid 19 pandemic has been the biggest public health crisis in the world since the Spanish flu of 1918. It has brought disease and death to many of our families and communities, and to healthcare workers and journalists, Including our own Lungile Tom and many others. Lungile Tom, an eNCA cameraman, is the only journalist to have died of the virus in our country so far. And, unless a vaccine is found and made freely available to all (meaning not closed off by patents and commercial barriers), Covid 19 may be with us for an unknown extended period of time.

But Covid 19 has also shone a light on all the issues facing humanity today – climate injustice, the vast inequalities, the abandonment of the poor majority by most governments, the parlous state of public healthcare and the social determinants of health, the growing authoritarianism and racism in many countries – from the USA to Brazil – and the collapse of countries in Africa and the Middle East by imperialist aggression.

Independent journalism continues to suffer through corporate strategies like shutting print media, downsizing and outsourcing functions, and putting up paywalls for online media. And by governments attacking independent and critical voices who do not play to mainstream and elite concerns.

The Journalist has become aware that the large majority of media professionals have had to take substantial pay-cuts during this pandemic. This is not an easy time for them and their families.

The Journalist, now that we are back, will continue to be counted in the effort to challenge narratives that limit deeper understandings of the national and international condition.

ISSUE #109

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