ISSUE #104

How to combat ‘media capture’


The age-old debate between the relative value of theory and practice is finally broken

Africa improves in wealth creation but not opportunity


Africa's large youth population presents many complex and important strategic challenges and solutions

The Future of America: What to Expect in mid-term US Elections on 6 November


Will Jamal Kashoggi’s brutal murder bring change to Saudi Arabia?


Jamal Kashoggi’s disappearance will not silence us

So this is democracy? A report on media freedom in Southern Africa


Highly contested environment and prevalence of fake news

Shifting the needle on economic growth


We need to raise a generation of men who do not rape, abuse or kill women


Women are under siege in South Africa

#DepressionIsReal is not only for the privileged


A hashtag cannot relay the experiences of 17 million people living with mental illnesses

A Need for Racial Reform in Academia in South Africa


A Response to the Call for African Renaissance

First Drum Woman Editor-in-Chief: Media shy Liz Khumalo


From secretary to Sis Dolly to newsroom leader

Trevor Noah and quantum mechanics: Two contradictory things can still be true


A strong lesson a polarized world

The silent scourge of campuses


Seeking help early is one of the main messages of our student counselling

The House of Tshatshu: Power, politics and chiefs north-west of the Great Kei River


A story of conquest, dispossession and un-naming

“I thought he would end up killing me”


Middle class black women from Soweto speak out about intimate partner violence

The ‘old boys club’ and glass ceilings for women in the SA news media


Sexist and patriarchal structures continue to hold women back

In sickness and in mental health


My grandparents’ love story did not end when my grandmother fell ill

Book Extract: Reversing Urban Inequality in Johannesburg


Where is “fanatical capitalism” taking us?

We bid farewell to theatre legend Winston Ntshona


South African theatre icon was a legend in his field

Dear Readers:Once Again…

The Journalist has been off-line for the past four months because we were hacked. At the beginning of March 2020 we promised new material after we went into a period of reflection meant to be about reviewing the state of journalism, our content, our funding model and our targeted audience.

The review was interrupted by the Covid 19 pandemic and lockdown and, along with everyone else in the country, we had to be more creative about how to have our discussions. But the hacking of the site was of such an order that it not only froze the site but threatened to destroy all our existing and past material. Rebuilding the site and making it secure from future attacks has had to be our focus over the past period.

We apologise to you, our readers, and to young journalists for this extended delay. We especially apologise to those who submitted articles over the past 4 months. Where possible and relevant we will consider these for publication now that we are back live.

We are now live once more ….ready to pursue our mission to give “history and context to key issues facing journalists in South Africa.”

The Covid 19 pandemic has been the biggest public health crisis in the world since the Spanish flu of 1918. It has brought disease and death to many of our families and communities, and to healthcare workers and journalists, Including our own Lungile Tom and many others. Lungile Tom, an eNCA cameraman, is the only journalist to have died of the virus in our country so far. And, unless a vaccine is found and made freely available to all (meaning not closed off by patents and commercial barriers), Covid 19 may be with us for an unknown extended period of time.

But Covid 19 has also shone a light on all the issues facing humanity today – climate injustice, the vast inequalities, the abandonment of the poor majority by most governments, the parlous state of public healthcare and the social determinants of health, the growing authoritarianism and racism in many countries – from the USA to Brazil – and the collapse of countries in Africa and the Middle East by imperialist aggression.

Independent journalism continues to suffer through corporate strategies like shutting print media, downsizing and outsourcing functions, and putting up paywalls for online media. And by governments attacking independent and critical voices who do not play to mainstream and elite concerns.

The Journalist has become aware that the large majority of media professionals have had to take substantial pay-cuts during this pandemic. This is not an easy time for them and their families.

The Journalist, now that we are back, will continue to be counted in the effort to challenge narratives that limit deeper understandings of the national and international condition.

ISSUE #104

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